File Under: HTML5, Programming

Gate One Puts a Terminal Emulator in Your Web Browser

If you’ve ever needed to connect to a remote server without installing any desktop software or doing anything other than opening a new browser window, then you need to check out Gate One. Gate One is a web-based terminal emulator and SSH client that will work in any modern web browser.

The brainchild of developer Dan McDougall, Gate One is the result of nine months of coding. While Gate One may not be the first project to put a terminal emulator in your browser — existing options include Shell in a Box and Ajaxterm among others — it has quite a few features that go well beyond the basics found in other emulators. For example, Gate One uses WebSockets rather than traditional polling so it’s able to keep SSH connections open without spiking your CPU and grinding the browser to a standstill. Gate One also has the ability to resume sessions after being disconnected.

Throw in multiple simultaneous terminal sessions, a way to save SSH bookmarks, a plugin architecture and the ability to play back, save and share terminal sessions and you’ve got a pretty respectable replacement for Putty and its ilk. Not that Gate One is intended to replace a desktop SSH client, but for situations where you can’t run a desktop app Gate One just might be the emulator you’ve been looking for.

The front end of Gate One is written entirely in HTML5 and JavaScript, which means it will work in any modern browser. Behind the scenes Gate One uses HTML5 WebSockets to connect to a Python-based SSH server.

Gate One is available from GitHub and is dual-licensed under either the AGPLv3 or a proprietary license.

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