Archive for the ‘Glossary’ Category

File Under: Glossary

BSD

Short for Berkeley Software Distribution, BSD is a full-featured Unix operating system developed at the University of California at Berkeley.

Its main application today is as a robust and scalable web server, though different permutations have arisen over the years that expand upon the original code. Different flavors of BSD Unix include NetBSD, FreeBSD, and OpenBSD. BSD remains popular at universities and throughout the open source movement.

File Under: Glossary

Data Binding

As a computer science term, data binding is the substitution of a real value in a program after it has been compiled.

For example, during compilation a compiler can assign symbolic addresses to certain variables or instructions. When the program is bound, or linked, the binder replaces the symbolic addresses with real machine addresses. The moment at which binding occurs is called “bind time” or “link time.” In dHTML, data binding allows the client to look into a database and retrieve the content. This data can be automatically displayed in your table using the HTML data binding extensions, or you can manipulate the data with a script.

File Under: Glossary

Fill

To fill an image means to paint the inside of it with a selected color or pattern.

The fill can be used to create shading and other simple effects. In HTML, a popular technique is to fill tables with colors, especially in long lists of information. For example, if you are making a web page showing the 50 top-grossing movies of the year, it will be easier to read if you fill the rows of the table and alternate the background colors.

File Under: Glossary

Inline Stylesheet

As opposed to a linked stylesheet, an inline stylesheet is included within an HTML document.

It is directly associated with a particular element, and the appearance of the document cannot easily be changed. The advantage is that the presentation of the document can be separated into the global style contained in the
<HEAD>
tag , and HTML can be used more appropriately for the document’s structure. Using an inline stylesheet at the beginning of the document allows the style and rendering to be modified without changing the HTML. On the other hand, using a linked stylesheet can be more efficient for a set of pages, because a linked style can be defined through a single file. Changing the entire website with a linked stylesheet can be done just by modifying the linked stylesheet file.

File Under: Glossary

Module

A module is a unit of code designed for a specific task that can be combined with other units to form a software program, and reused for different programs. Module can also refer to hardware components, such as a unit of RAM.