Archive for the ‘Glossary’ Category

File Under: Glossary

Layers

Many image-processing programs, like Adobe Photoshop, allow you to build images in layers. These layers are created one at a time and placed on top of each other to assemble the whole image. While the file is a pile of little layered images, you can manipulate each layer individually and look at how each change will alter the completed picture.

File Under: Glossary

Perl


Practical extraction and reporting language, or Perl, is a scripting language first created by Larry Wall to be used as duct tape for programming with the Unix operating system. Due to its immense power for handling piles of text and, consequently, as a common gateway interface (CGI) scripting language, Perl became very popular among server-side scripters. Perl has a large community of contributing programmers and, what’s more, costs nothing and is free to redistribute. These circumstances have helped Perl evolve from a scripting language used to generate server stats into a language many use for database administration. All along Perl has maintained its zaniness. Most Perl documentation reads as though written by early vaudeville comedians.

File Under: Glossary

Release Candidate

The release candidate stage is the stage right between beta and final release, and it’s the last chance for developers to test their code against the browser before it’s push out into the world full-force. It’s also the stage at which add-on developers can update their third-party extensions without worrying about further code changes.

File Under: Glossary

Solaris


A popular and widely-used flavor of Unix, Solaris (formerly named SunOS) is used for large-scale enterprise networks with tens of thousands of active nodes. Solaris is capable of distributed computing (using multiple computers’ processors to complete a single task) and symmetrical multi-processing (running two or more processors in one computer). The OS ships on Sun’s Sparc workstations along with graphical interfaces to increase user-friendliness.

File Under: Glossary

Visitor


You’d think that figuring out how many unique individuals visit a website in a given time period would be pretty easy, but in reality it’s not. Web site developers have few ways of determining exactly how many people use a given computer, IP address, or ISP account. In fact, beyond the data you get from registration processes and cookies, there’s very little reliable information on how many people visit a site, which makes hard numbers hard to come by.