Archive for the ‘Glossary’ Category

File Under: Glossary

DNS

The domain name system (DNS) is an internet service that translates domain names (like wired.com) into IP addresses (like 208.77.188.166).

We use domain names because people can remember words better than numbers, but web servers still need the IP numbers to access the page. Every time you use a domain name, a DNS server must translate the name into the corresponding IP address.

File Under: Glossary

Pixel


The cell is nature’s building block, and the pixel is the web designer’s. Pixel is one of those half-baked half-acronyms:PICture ELement. It refers to how monitors divide the display screen into thousands or millions of individual dots. A pixel is one of those dots. An 8-bit color monitor can display 256 pixels, while a 24-bit color monitor can display more than 16 million. If you design a web graphic on a 24-bit monitor, there’s an excellent chance that many of your 16 million pixels won’t be seen by visitors to your site. Since the agreed-upon lowest common denominator palette for the web has 216 colors, you should design your graphics using 8-bit color. (see Bit Depth)

File Under: Glossary

Retention


Retention refers a company’s desire to keep you as a customer by any (cost-effective) means necessary.

File Under: Glossary

Streaming


Rather than download a big, chunky audio/video file all at once, streaming allows you to see and hear an audio/video file as it’s transferred. Windows Media, RealNetworks, and QuickTime are currently the three most popular streaming media platforms. A player program (which are available for free) must be downloaded for each of these technologies in order to decompress audio/video files, which you can then listen to or view. Streaming video is usually sent from prerecorded video files, but they can be broadcast live as well.

File Under: Glossary

WYSIWYG


WYSIWYG (pronounced “wiz-ee-wig”) stands for “what you see is what you get” and refers to programs that show on a screen exactly what will appear when a document is printed. Microsoft’s FrontPage and Adobe’s Go Live are WYSIWYG HTML editors.