Archive for the ‘Glossary’ Category

File Under: Glossary

Architecture

In computer science, architecture means the conceptual arrangement of a system’s components.

Taking the analogy of a physical building, if a website’s individual pages are rooms, its architecture is the hypertextual relationship between the rooms within the structure.

File Under: Glossary

CLUT file

In computer graphics, a color look-up table, or CLUT, is the set of available colors for a given application.

For example, a 24-bit system can display 16 million unique colors, but a given program would use only 256 of them at a time if the display is in 256-color mode. The CLUT in this case would consist of the 16 million colors, but the program’s palette would contain only the 256-color subset. To avoid dithering (i.e., varying the pattern of dots in an image) on 8-bit machines, you should only use colors from a predesignated CLUT.

File Under: Glossary

Document Object Model

The document object model (DOM) is the specification for how objects on a web page are represented.

A DOM defines each object on a web page (images, text, scripts, links, etc.) and also defines what attributes are associated with these objects and how they can be manipulated.

File Under: Glossary

Hash

A hash, also known as an associative array, is a collection of data in which each piece of data has two components: a key and a value. Much like the hash at your local diner, JavaScript hashes go unordered: They’re not indexed by numbers. For example, if you wish to use JavaScript to put up a different GIF animation on your site every day of the week, you might throw all these animations into a hash associated to each weekday as a key. Then you would refer to the key day to invoke that day’s animation.

For example, in a normal array, you’d have:

  dinner[0] = "monkey brain";

  dinner[1] = "meatloaf";

But in a hash, you could use a string as the index:

  dinner["monday"] = "monkey brain";

  dinner["tuesday"] = "meatloaf";

File Under: Glossary

Kiosk

The more modern definition of kiosk refers to public terminals that offer anything from internet access to travel information to ATM services. Electronic kiosks require a simple user interface and rugged hardware. Touchscreens enable a user to enter and display information without the need for a mouse or keyboard. Alternative input methods must be considered, however, for those who can’t use touchscreens, such as people with physical disabilities.