Archive for the ‘Glossary’ Category

File Under: Glossary

Bit Depth

Bit depth describes the file size of an image by orders of magnitude.

When wrangling with file size versus image quality, it’s often important to minimize the bit depth of an image while maximizing the number of colors. To calculate the maximum number of colors for an image of a particular bit depth, remember that the number of colors is equal to two to the power of what the bit depth is. For example, a GIF can support up to eight bits per pixel, and therefore can have as a many as 256 colors, since two to the power of eight equals 256.

File Under: Glossary

Creative

Creatives refer to an advertisements text or copy.

Advertising people are funny. They call magazines “books,” television “broadcast,” and advertisements “creative.” While the idea of calling ads “creative” may vary from ludicrously hopeful to woefully inadequate, when someone from the advertising world tells you they’ve been doing some great creative lately, what they really mean is “ads.”

File Under: Glossary

Event

Events are user interactions with their computer, such as a mouse click or key press.

In the good ol’ days, computers handled user interactions as input of batched data. The user fed a hunk of data in, the computer did something to that data, then produced the results. With the advent of interactive devices like the GUI interface, computers could display answers to computations onscreen. The input for these interactions are events caused by the user, which could be keystrokes, button clicks, or the position of the mouse pointer. (see Event Handler).

File Under: Glossary

IIS

Microsoft’s internet information server, or IIS, is one of the most widely used commercial web server applications on the market. It runs on the Windows operating system and it incorporates all of the tools required by high-traffic commercial websites, such as security, extensions, logging, database interfaces and all of the necessary protocols.

File Under: Glossary

Mbone

Mbone is short for multicast backbone on the internet, and is an extension to the internet designed to support IP multicasting, or the transmission of data packets to multiple addresses. Most of this traffic is streaming audio and video which, like radio and TV broadcasts, is sent to many people at once. The Mbone was established in 1994 by the Internet Engineering Task Force.

Mbone is likely to go obsolete with the adoption of IPv6 which supports multicasting by default.