Archive for the ‘UI/UX’ Category

File Under: CSS, Fonts, UI/UX

Web Typography Tutorial – Lesson 1

Before I knew anything about typography, I thought of it as some kind of high magic, shrouded in arcane terminology and a long, mysterious history. Since then, I’ve learned enough to know that – although that’s all quite true – even us mere mortals can use type sensitively by learning a bit about how it works and paying just a little attention to how it is used.


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File Under: CSS, Fonts, UI/UX

Web Typography Tutorial – Lesson 2

Ask any web designer about the use of typographic design on web pages and they’ll tell you the same truth: The web is a harsh, uninviting environment for the delicateness of fine typography. Along with the usual web culprit of platform inconsistency, the extreme low resolution of even the best current screens means type online can only allude to the geometry of the typefaces you’ve so carefully chosen and specified.

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File Under: JavaScript, Programming, UI/UX

Build Dynamic Breadcrumbs With JavaScript

Once upon a time, a web designer wished to communicate a page’s location within the hierarchy of an entire site. There was only a small space available at the top of the page. The designer thought for a while, and eventually found the answer between the keys of his keyboard:breadcrumbs.

What are breadcrumbs? Well, if you have ever browsed an online store or read posts in a forum, you have likely encountered breadcrumbs. They provide an easy way to see where you are on a site. Sites like Craigslist use breadcrumbs to describe the user’s location. Above the listings on each page is something that looks like this:

 s.f. bayarea craigslist > city of san francisco > bicycles 

Translated to English, that says “I’m looking at bicycles for sale within the city limits of San Francisco, which is located in the San Francisco bay area.” Phrased another way, it says, “If I go to the Craigslist home page, click on the San Francisco location, and then choose bikes for sale, then, with a little luck, I’ll find these listings.”

As far as I can tell, the name “breadcrumb navigation” is derived from the children’s story of “Hansel and Gretel” by the Brothers Grimm:

“Just wait, Gretel, until the moon rises, and then we shall see the crumbs of bread which I have strewn about, they will show us our way home again.”

Smart Hansel! So, that’s the skinny on breadcrumbs. Now let’s look at how they can be used on your site to help your users find their way around.

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File Under: JavaScript, UI/UX

Live Thumbnails

This is the JavaScript example from the Webmonkey tutorial Make Images Grow and Shrink With JavaScript. This script will allow you to put “live thumbnails” of images on your website. The thumbnails will grow and shrink when users click on them.


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File Under: UI/UX

Create Custom 404 Pages

The web server cannot find the file or script you asked for. Please check the URL to ensure that the path is correct.

Please contact the server’s administrator if this problem persists.




Ha! I bet you thought this page wasn’t here. Ha ha! Hooo! Yeah.

That 404 message above is familiar enough to most people to stimulate a Pavlovian click of the Back button. Which means it’s doing its job. 404 Not Found is the most famous of the HTTP status codes. These status codes are three-digit responses that an HTTP server returns when given a request. These codes fall into three series:2xx, which means success, 3xx, which means partial success (redirection), and 4xx/5xx, for errors on the part of the client and the server respectively. Some highlights include 200 OK, which is the most common, but rarely seen in the flesh — it just means everything worked; 401 Unauthorized, when HTTP authorization has blocked a request; 500 Internal Error, when the server somehow couldn’t provide the requested page. 404 is the one that pops up when the client asks for a page that isn’t there.

So what does your average web surfer do when she hits a 404 page? At best, she trims the URL layer by layer until she finds what she’s looking for, or returns to the home page and searches. At worst, she goes elsewhere and never returns to your site.

Either way, 404s represent a major bleed-off of traffic and source of user frustration, which, as hospitable web providers, we want to do our best to avoid. So what can be done?

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