All posts tagged ‘Backend’

File Under: Glossary

Broadband

Broadband is a general term used to describe any high-speed, high-bandwidth, “always on” internet connection.

Cable modems, DSL modems, satellite link-ups, and T1 lines are all broadband devices. Dial-up modems and other low-bandwidth devices are called “narrowband.”

File Under: Glossary

NetCaster

NetCaster was Netscape Communicator’s push delivery system. It was basically a web environment that is always active and can update its onscreen appearance without going to a new URL or reloading. Like all push mechanisms, NetCaster doesn’t require the user to manually check for new content or sit through an update. It let the developer put new content in front of users instead of hoping they come looking for it.

The Netscape Communicator browser ceased development in 2002.

File Under: Glossary

BSD

Short for Berkeley Software Distribution, BSD is a full-featured Unix operating system developed at the University of California at Berkeley.

Its main application today is as a robust and scalable web server, though different permutations have arisen over the years that expand upon the original code. Different flavors of BSD Unix include NetBSD, FreeBSD, and OpenBSD. BSD remains popular at universities and throughout the open source movement.

File Under: Glossary

Path


The path tool in Photoshop enables the selecting, identifying, and saving of parts of an image more precisely than the Lasso tool. Using the path tool, you can create an adjustable line connected by dots around a particular area. Once you’ve completed a circle, the path tool will select that area, allowing you to name and save it. The path can then be manipulated just as you’d manipulate a layer.

File Under: Glossary

Cache

Caching (pronounced CASH-ing) is a technique computers use to save memory by storing frequently accessed files.

Web browsers have caches that keep recently downloaded web pages handy. Browser caches are typically kept on your local drive, and you can usually adjust the amount of memory or disk space allotted for the cache. The benefit of web caches is that you can access a cached page much more quickly than if you downloaded it from a distant server.