All posts tagged ‘Backend’

File Under: Glossary


In computer science, architecture means the conceptual arrangement of a system’s components.

Taking the analogy of a physical building, if a website’s individual pages are rooms, its architecture is the hypertextual relationship between the rooms within the structure.

File Under: Glossary


A bridge (not to be confused with a router) is a data network device used to connect two network segments of different protocols.

For example, if you want computers on a TCP/IP network to talk to computers on a token ring network, you need a bridge to connect the two segments.

File Under: Glossary


Broadband is a general term used to describe any high-speed, high-bandwidth, “always on” internet connection.

Cable modems, DSL modems, satellite link-ups, and T1 lines are all broadband devices. Dial-up modems and other low-bandwidth devices are called “narrowband.”

File Under: Glossary


Short for Berkeley Software Distribution, BSD is a full-featured Unix operating system developed at the University of California at Berkeley.

Its main application today is as a robust and scalable web server, though different permutations have arisen over the years that expand upon the original code. Different flavors of BSD Unix include NetBSD, FreeBSD, and OpenBSD. BSD remains popular at universities and throughout the open source movement.

File Under: Glossary


Caching (pronounced CASH-ing) is a technique computers use to save memory by storing frequently accessed files.

Web browsers have caches that keep recently downloaded web pages handy. Browser caches are typically kept on your local drive, and you can usually adjust the amount of memory or disk space allotted for the cache. The benefit of web caches is that you can access a cached page much more quickly than if you downloaded it from a distant server.