All posts tagged ‘Backend’

File Under: Glossary

Bridge

A bridge (not to be confused with a router) is a data network device used to connect two network segments of different protocols.

For example, if you want computers on a TCP/IP network to talk to computers on a token ring network, you need a bridge to connect the two segments.

File Under: Glossary

Mbone

Mbone is short for multicast backbone on the internet, and is an extension to the internet designed to support IP multicasting, or the transmission of data packets to multiple addresses. Most of this traffic is streaming audio and video which, like radio and TV broadcasts, is sent to many people at once. The Mbone was established in 1994 by the Internet Engineering Task Force.

Mbone is likely to go obsolete with the adoption of IPv6 which supports multicasting by default.

File Under: Glossary

Broadband

Broadband is a general term used to describe any high-speed, high-bandwidth, “always on” internet connection.

Cable modems, DSL modems, satellite link-ups, and T1 lines are all broadband devices. Dial-up modems and other low-bandwidth devices are called “narrowband.”

File Under: Glossary

NetCaster

NetCaster was Netscape Communicator’s push delivery system. It was basically a web environment that is always active and can update its onscreen appearance without going to a new URL or reloading. Like all push mechanisms, NetCaster doesn’t require the user to manually check for new content or sit through an update. It let the developer put new content in front of users instead of hoping they come looking for it.

The Netscape Communicator browser ceased development in 2002.

File Under: Glossary

BSD

Short for Berkeley Software Distribution, BSD is a full-featured Unix operating system developed at the University of California at Berkeley.

Its main application today is as a robust and scalable web server, though different permutations have arisen over the years that expand upon the original code. Different flavors of BSD Unix include NetBSD, FreeBSD, and OpenBSD. BSD remains popular at universities and throughout the open source movement.