All posts tagged ‘Backend’

File Under: Glossary

HTTP

The conversation between browsers and servers takes place according to the hypertext transfer protocol, or HTTP.

Written by Tim Berners-Lee, it was first implemented on the web in 1991 as HTTP 0.9. Currently, web browsers and servers support version 1.1 of HTTP. It supports persistent connections, meaning that once a browser connects to a web server, it can receive multiple files through the same connection.

File Under: Glossary

IIS

Microsoft’s internet information server, or IIS, is one of the most widely used commercial web server applications on the market. It runs on the Windows operating system and it incorporates all of the tools required by high-traffic commercial websites, such as security, extensions, logging, database interfaces and all of the necessary protocols.

File Under: Glossary

ISP

Short for internet service provider, an ISP owns and operates all of the equipment (telephony, digital cable, servers, etc.) that allow you to connect to the internet from your home or office.

Most ISPs sell access to their services for a small monthly fee, which you can access by connecting to your ISP’s computer network through a phone or cable line.

File Under: Glossary

Mbone

Mbone is short for multicast backbone on the internet, and is an extension to the internet designed to support IP multicasting, or the transmission of data packets to multiple addresses. Most of this traffic is streaming audio and video which, like radio and TV broadcasts, is sent to many people at once. The Mbone was established in 1994 by the Internet Engineering Task Force.

Mbone is likely to go obsolete with the adoption of IPv6 which supports multicasting by default.

File Under: Glossary

NetCaster

NetCaster was Netscape Communicator’s push delivery system. It was basically a web environment that is always active and can update its onscreen appearance without going to a new URL or reloading. Like all push mechanisms, NetCaster doesn’t require the user to manually check for new content or sit through an update. It let the developer put new content in front of users instead of hoping they come looking for it.

The Netscape Communicator browser ceased development in 2002.