All posts tagged ‘Backend’

File Under: Glossary

Path


The path tool in Photoshop enables the selecting, identifying, and saving of parts of an image more precisely than the Lasso tool. Using the path tool, you can create an adjustable line connected by dots around a particular area. Once you’ve completed a circle, the path tool will select that area, allowing you to name and save it. The path can then be manipulated just as you’d manipulate a layer.

File Under: Glossary

Cache

Caching (pronounced CASH-ing) is a technique computers use to save memory by storing frequently accessed files.

Web browsers have caches that keep recently downloaded web pages handy. Browser caches are typically kept on your local drive, and you can usually adjust the amount of memory or disk space allotted for the cache. The benefit of web caches is that you can access a cached page much more quickly than if you downloaded it from a distant server.

File Under: Glossary

Channels

Channels refer to the conduits in which to deliver content or data.

In web development, channels may refer to the data feeds allowing content onscreen without reloading the page or redrawing the whole screen. Channels may also refer to the paths a computer uses to transmit information between peripherals.

File Under: Glossary

Data Binding

As a computer science term, data binding is the substitution of a real value in a program after it has been compiled.

For example, during compilation a compiler can assign symbolic addresses to certain variables or instructions. When the program is bound, or linked, the binder replaces the symbolic addresses with real machine addresses. The moment at which binding occurs is called “bind time” or “link time.” In dHTML, data binding allows the client to look into a database and retrieve the content. This data can be automatically displayed in your table using the HTML data binding extensions, or you can manipulate the data with a script.

File Under: Glossary

DHCP

The dynamic host configuration protocol (DHCP) is an addressing protocol for TCP/IP networks.

IP addresses are leased to individual computers on the network from a DHCP server. DHCP allows users to move to different locations on a network without having to bother a network administrator (and they hate being bothered) to manually assign a new IP address. DHCP is useful in homes with several computers sharing a single high-speed internet connection.