All posts tagged ‘design’

File Under: Glossary

Layers

Many image-processing programs, like Adobe Photoshop, allow you to build images in layers. These layers are created one at a time and placed on top of each other to assemble the whole image. While the file is a pile of little layered images, you can manipulate each layer individually and look at how each change will alter the completed picture.

File Under: Glossary

Font

A font is the overall design for a set of characters. It describes the size, weight, and spacing of a character and shouldn’t be confused with a typeface, which is a more general term. Courier is a typeface; Courier 24-point bold is a font. Computers display fonts in either a bitmap or a vector format. In a bitmapped font, each character is represented by an arrangement of dots. In a vector font system, the shape or outline of each character is defined geometrically. Since a vector font is scalable according to the defined outline, a vector system can make many differently sized fonts from one defined set of characters. Currently, the most widely used vector font systems are PostScript and TrueType.
File Under: Glossary

GIMP


GIMP stands for GNU Image Manipulation Program, and is a free software program for image authoring and composition, and photo retouching. The program has a scripting interface and can be expanded with plug-ins and extensions.

File Under: Glossary

Outline Font


An outline font supplies a geometrical description of each character so that the font can be rendered in a variety of sizes. Since they are scalable, outline fonts can make the most of an output device’s resolution. The greater the resolution of the monitor, the sharper the characters will look. Popular languages for defining outline fonts are PostScript and TrueType.

File Under: Glossary

Palette


Much like an oil painter with her palette of many unique color combinations, each operating system has its own palette. Many computers out there display only 256 colors at a time, and the Macintosh and Windows operating systems reserve about 40 colors out of the 256, leaving 216 available. Netscape Navigator, Microsoft Internet Explorer, and NCSA Mosaic implemented a 216-color palette that won’t dither (i.e., vary the pattern of dots in an image) on different platforms and is “browser safe” (in other words, these 216 colors will always look the same, no matter what platform or browser is being used). Theoretically.