All posts tagged ‘networks’

File Under: Glossary

Mbone

Mbone is short for multicast backbone on the internet, and is an extension to the internet designed to support IP multicasting, or the transmission of data packets to multiple addresses. Most of this traffic is streaming audio and video which, like radio and TV broadcasts, is sent to many people at once. The Mbone was established in 1994 by the Internet Engineering Task Force.

Mbone is likely to go obsolete with the adoption of IPv6 which supports multicasting by default.

File Under: Glossary

NAT

Short for network address translation, a NAT server acts as a transition point between your local LAN and the internet at large.

The NAT server converts all of the IP addresses on your local LAN to one single IP address. When NAT is active, your LAN appears and acts as one entity when viewed from the internet. The NAT server continues to resolve individual local addresses when requests from the internet are received.

File Under: Glossary

NetCaster

NetCaster was Netscape Communicator’s push delivery system. It was basically a web environment that is always active and can update its onscreen appearance without going to a new URL or reloading. Like all push mechanisms, NetCaster doesn’t require the user to manually check for new content or sit through an update. It let the developer put new content in front of users instead of hoping they come looking for it.

The Netscape Communicator browser ceased development in 2002.

File Under: Glossary

DNS

The domain name system (DNS) is an internet service that translates domain names (like wired.com) into IP addresses (like 208.77.188.166).

We use domain names because people can remember words better than numbers, but web servers still need the IP numbers to access the page. Every time you use a domain name, a DNS server must translate the name into the corresponding IP address.

File Under: Glossary

Bridge

A bridge (not to be confused with a router) is a data network device used to connect two network segments of different protocols.

For example, if you want computers on a TCP/IP network to talk to computers on a token ring network, you need a bridge to connect the two segments.