All posts tagged ‘networks’

File Under: Glossary

DHCP

The dynamic host configuration protocol (DHCP) is an addressing protocol for TCP/IP networks.

IP addresses are leased to individual computers on the network from a DHCP server. DHCP allows users to move to different locations on a network without having to bother a network administrator (and they hate being bothered) to manually assign a new IP address. DHCP is useful in homes with several computers sharing a single high-speed internet connection.

File Under: Glossary

DSL

A digital subscriber line, or DSL, is a communications technology that allows data to travel at very high speeds over standard telephone wire without interrupting normal telephone service.

The primary market for DSL is the home office since the technology makes it easy for residential homes to receive high-speed internet access at a reasonable price. DSL speeds, on the average, run at about 600kbps for downstream and 128kbps for upstream.

File Under: Glossary

ISP

Short for internet service provider, an ISP owns and operates all of the equipment (telephony, digital cable, servers, etc.) that allow you to connect to the internet from your home or office.

Most ISPs sell access to their services for a small monthly fee, which you can access by connecting to your ISP’s computer network through a phone or cable line.

File Under: Glossary

Mbone

Mbone is short for multicast backbone on the internet, and is an extension to the internet designed to support IP multicasting, or the transmission of data packets to multiple addresses. Most of this traffic is streaming audio and video which, like radio and TV broadcasts, is sent to many people at once. The Mbone was established in 1994 by the Internet Engineering Task Force.

Mbone is likely to go obsolete with the adoption of IPv6 which supports multicasting by default.

File Under: Glossary

NAT

Short for network address translation, a NAT server acts as a transition point between your local LAN and the internet at large.

The NAT server converts all of the IP addresses on your local LAN to one single IP address. When NAT is active, your LAN appears and acts as one entity when viewed from the internet. The NAT server continues to resolve individual local addresses when requests from the internet are received.