All posts tagged ‘UI/UX’

File Under: Glossary

Event Handler

Event handlers are functions that handle client-side events.

Commonly used JavaScript event handlers include onClick, onMouseOver, and onLoad. When one of these events occurs – the user clicks on a link, for example – the event handler for that event will be executed.

File Under: Glossary

Iframe

Short for “inline frame,” Iframes are used to insert a block of text into a separate HTML document. Iframes can float above page elements using absolute positioning, or they can be placed directly on the page with page elements flowing around them. Unlike regular frames, Iframes can not be resized by the user. (NOTE:Iframes are not supported by older browsers.)

File Under: Glossary

Image Maps

Image maps are images that have several links geographically mapped onto it.

For example, an image map of a photograph of the Beatles might enable you to click on Ringo and receive a page describing his drumming abilities. Click on George, and receive a file about how Eric Clapton stole Patti Boyd. One thing to remember about image maps is that they are a purely visual form of navigation, so if your visitor isn’t loading the images, they’ll never know where to click. For this reason, you should always include text links under the images as an alternative way to navigate.

File Under: Glossary

Interactive

A web page is interactive when it prompts a response from the user.

Immediacy is the key to interactivity: If you click on a button that says “chat,” then that experience would be considered “more interactive” if you are immediately able to chat with someone online. The experience would be “less interactive” if the response was an email address for a mailing list on which you are allowed to discuss a particular issue. Interactive is really just another code word for describing how graphical elements in web pages work together with the software behind them.

File Under: Glossary

Interstitial

An Interstitial is a web advertisement that appears on its own page, typically in between “content” pages. Interstitials are typically not clickable (or are linked to the page you’d originally hoped to reach), but are usually buffered by a similar, smaller advertisement on the subsequent content page that allows you to investigate the advertiser’s product. By mid-1997, interstitials were at the top of every advertiser’s want list, but have lost popularity since then.