All posts tagged ‘wiki’

File Under: Ajax

Ajax for Beginners

JavaScript has had the XMLHttpRequest object for almost a decade now, but it really only started getting wide attention in 2004. All this attention was mostly due to some showoff web applications that made every developer who saw them think, “I want my site to do that!” But it also has to do with the spiffy, spiffy name given to it by the folks at AdaptivePath, who named this asynchronized application Ajax. Maybe you’ve heard of it?

A few high-profile Google applications in particular made a splash with Ajax: Maps and Gmail were first. It also powers some of the core functionality in the user interface of the ever-so-popular photo sharing site Flickr. By now, Ajax has become integral to the fabric of the web, especially in the era of real-time applications like Twitter, Buzz and Wave (all of which use Ajax extensively in their webapp front ends, for the record). Ajax may also lay claim to being the first JavaScript object with its own fan website. Date.com doesn’t count, although I did have a scintillating chat with a lady there once about the getTimeZoneoffset method.

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File Under: Glossary

CMYK

CMYK stands for cyan magenta yellow and blacK and is a color system used in the offset printing of full-color documents.

Offset uses cyan, magenta, yellow, and black inks and is often referred to as “four-color” printing. Monitors use red, green, and blue light instead, so they display images using a different color system called RGB. One of the great problems of the digital age has been matching colors between these two systems; i.e., taking a digital RGB image and making it look the same in print using CMYK. These problems are addressed by applications such as the Pantone Matching System.

File Under: Glossary

Hash

A hash, also known as an associative array, is a collection of data in which each piece of data has two components: a key and a value. Much like the hash at your local diner, JavaScript hashes go unordered: They’re not indexed by numbers. For example, if you wish to use JavaScript to put up a different GIF animation on your site every day of the week, you might throw all these animations into a hash associated to each weekday as a key. Then you would refer to the key day to invoke that day’s animation.

For example, in a normal array, you’d have:

  dinner[0] = "monkey brain";

  dinner[1] = "meatloaf";

But in a hash, you could use a string as the index:

  dinner["monday"] = "monkey brain";

  dinner["tuesday"] = "meatloaf";

File Under: Glossary

Webographics


If you’re at all interested in e-biz, you’d better get serious about tracking webographics. A user’s webographic profile includes platform (Mac, Unix, or Windows), browser make (IE, Netscape) and model (3.0, 4.0), and connection speed (T1, 28.8, 14.4). Each of these factors can have a dramatic effect on a user’s experience, and every developer must decide whether to build a site that’s accessible to everyone (meaning fancy cutting-edge doodads are out) or create something really cool that won’t work unless users upgrade. We, of course, recommend the former.

File Under: Glossary

PMS


The Pantone Matching System (PMS) is a popular system for printing inks. Often a printer has two choices for creating an ink color:process color and spot color. Process color uses a mixture of four specific colors – cyan, magenta, yellow, and black – to create the desired shade. Spot color uses a matching system to create the shade. By specifying the official Pantone name or number, you can be assured of the color match when the file is printed.