All posts tagged ‘wiki’

File Under: Ajax

Ajax for Beginners

JavaScript has had the XMLHttpRequest object for almost a decade now, but it really only started getting wide attention in 2004. All this attention was mostly due to some showoff web applications that made every developer who saw them think, “I want my site to do that!” But it also has to do with the spiffy, spiffy name given to it by the folks at AdaptivePath, who named this asynchronized application Ajax. Maybe you’ve heard of it?

A few high-profile Google applications in particular made a splash with Ajax: Maps and Gmail were first. It also powers some of the core functionality in the user interface of the ever-so-popular photo sharing site Flickr. By now, Ajax has become integral to the fabric of the web, especially in the era of real-time applications like Twitter, Buzz and Wave (all of which use Ajax extensively in their webapp front ends, for the record). Ajax may also lay claim to being the first JavaScript object with its own fan website. Date.com doesn’t count, although I did have a scintillating chat with a lady there once about the getTimeZoneoffset method.

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File Under: Glossary

BeOS

BeOS, or Be Operating System, was the flagship product of Be, Inc.

Development of the operating system ceased around 2001 after the purchase of Be, Inc. by Palm, Inc. Development for BeOS has continued thanks to a small community of developers.

File Under: Glossary

Duotone

Duotones are images that only display in two colors.

Like most visual techniques on the Web, duotones come from the world of print. In print, the more colors you use, the slower the production time and the higher the cost, so duotones were often an economical alternative. Duotones can also improve efficiency on the web by enabling the creation of cool-looking images with small file sizes. Duotones are made by first creating a grayscale image and then overlaying it with a different specified color.

File Under: Glossary

Linux

Linux is a free and efficient open-source implementation of Unix. Originally developed in 1991 by Linus Torvalds, Linux now runs on most computer platforms and is available for all major microprocessors. Several large software companies now sell their own version of the OS, but it is still freely available for those who want to modify it. However, any modified version that is redistributed must also be freely available.

File Under: Glossary

Open Source


In early 1998, Netscape announced that it would release the source code of its next-generation browser as a part of its open source strategy. The source code contains the programming elements that make up the Communicator software application. It is not a compiled program and thus cannot be used by traditional software end-users. Mozilla, as it is called, was released as C++ source code and caused a flutter of excitement in part because of its implementation of the World Wide Web Consortium’s standards, eXtensible markup language (XML), and the resource description framework. (see Aurora)