Archive for the ‘Databases’ Category

File Under: Databases, Programming

Build a Website With Flash and MySQL – Lesson 2

In Build a Website With Flash and MySQL – Lesson 1, we successfully created a MySQL database, filled it with blog entries, and learned how to query it. Now we’re going to move on to the fun stuff:creating a Flash container to display our blog entries as we pull them out of the database. I’m going to help you build something along the lines of what you’ll encounter at my own Flash blog site, Luxagraf.

Fire up Flash and create a new document. The first thing we need is a nice big text field to display our entries. You could create a text field in ActionScript if you like, using the createTextField() method. I don’t know about you, but my stomach for code is still full from yesterday, so I’ve just drawn a text field using the cursor tool and given it an instance name of entries_txt. In the Properties Inspector, set the text to be dynamic, multi-line, and HTML formatted. For safety’s sake, select the character option and click “embed all characters.” Flash has some issues with dynamic textfields that don’t have embedded characters, especially if you put your text under a mask. Continue Reading “Build a Website With Flash and MySQL – Lesson 2″ »

File Under: Databases

PHP and MySQL Tutorial – Lesson 2

In this lesson, we’re going to dive right in and create some simple yet useful pages using PHP and MySQL. Let’s start by displaying the database we created yesterday in Lesson 1, but with a little more panache.

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File Under: Databases, Programming

PHP and MySQL Tutorial – Lesson 3

Welcome to the third and final lesson for this tutorial. If you’ve gone through Lesson 1 and Lesson 2, you already know the essentials for installing and writing useful scripts with MySQL and PHP. We’re going to look at some useful PHP functions that should make your life a lot easier. First, let’s look at include files.

We all know the basics of includes, right? Contents of an external file are referenced and imported into the main file. It’s pretty easy:You call a file and it’s included. When we do this in PHP there are two functions we need to talk about:include() and require(). The difference between these two functions is subtle but important, so let’s take a closer look. The require() function works in a XSSI-like way; files are included as part of the original document as soon as that file is parsed, regardless of its location in the script. So if you decide to place a require() function inside a conditional loop, the external file will be included even if that part of the conditional loop is false.


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File Under: Databases, Programming

Cake and Trax for Beginners

In my last article, Building With Ajax and Rails I made a faintly disparaging joke about some new web frameworks that have been created in fond imitation of Rails. I got a lot of feedback about that joke. I’m not allowed to comment here about the pending lawsuits, but I would ask that the drive-by eggings of my house and threats to my family please cease. (They’ve been relocated to a secret Webmonkey farm anyway.)

Today we’re going to take a look at a couple of those frameworks for PHP:Trax and Cake. Both attempt to bring the quick, easy, helpful tools and easily understood, easily maintained structure of Rails to PHP — a boon to web developers who know PHP and perhaps have some keeper code in that language, but can’t resist the Rails buzz. Both Trax and Cake use the same model-view-controller pattern and Active Record ways of addressing data that Rails does. Makes one curious, no? I don’t have time to get deeply into them today, but both stress “rapid development,” so let’s see if I, your average not-too-bright web developer, can get a little app off the ground before the end of this article.

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File Under: Databases

Manage Transactions in MySQL

Overview

In this tell-all tutorial, Jay Greenspan, author of MySQL Weekend Crash Course and co-author of MySQL/PHP Database Applications, starts with a tour of the basics: He answers the age-old Q: “What’s the big deal with Transactions?”; investigates the four properties that a database must have to be considered transaction-capable; takes a closer look at locking mechanisms; and finishes up with a look at MyISAM tables, the lesser cousin of fully transaction-capable tables.

Once you have a taste of the limitations of MyISAM tables, you’ll be hungry for the real deal. In Lesson 2, Jay satiates that hunger with a thorough introduction to MySQL’s different transactional table types: BDB, Gemini, and InnoDB.

Get started: Lesson 1