All posts tagged ‘wiki’

File Under: Glossary

Micropayments

Another elusive Holy Grail of online business, micropayments let content providers charge very small fees (some fraction of a penny, say) for access to a site or other electronic information. The aggregated payments are then deducted from a user’s ecash account or credit card, making the experience highly fluid. However, unless you rack up a lot of micropayments, the cost of processing each transaction is far greater than the revenue gained. On top of that, your users have to be willing to set up an ecash account.

File Under: Glossary

Layers

Many image-processing programs, like Adobe Photoshop, allow you to build images in layers. These layers are created one at a time and placed on top of each other to assemble the whole image. While the file is a pile of little layered images, you can manipulate each layer individually and look at how each change will alter the completed picture.

File Under: Glossary

Path


The path tool in Photoshop enables the selecting, identifying, and saving of parts of an image more precisely than the Lasso tool. Using the path tool, you can create an adjustable line connected by dots around a particular area. Once you’ve completed a circle, the path tool will select that area, allowing you to name and save it. The path can then be manipulated just as you’d manipulate a layer.

File Under: Glossary

Referral Network


Think of the food court at the mall. Most of the time, mallsters will go there looking for food in general, then decide what to eat after they’ve checked out the selection. The eaters benefit because they don’t have to wander all over the mall looking for lunch, and the feeders benefit from the added exposure. A referral network works in the same way. The web is perfect for this kind of marketing, since sites with similar audiences can be grouped just by linking them together. Amazon.com has an incredibly successful network of thousands of mini-bookstores. The small bookstores get more customers, and Amazon gets money for the books they sell to the little guys – a perfect symbiotic relationship.

File Under: Glossary

Sitemaps

Until recently, sitemaps were hand-drawn or script-drawn tree diagrams. Now browsers that support eXtensible markup language (XML) offer more elaborate sitemaps as a special feature. The newer sitemaps provide a hierarchical description of a site, written in the resource description framework, an XML application still being developed as a standard by the World Wide Web Consortium. For example, Netscape’s Mozilla finds RDF sitemaps by looking for
<LINK rel=sitemap>
tags in your web pages. This tag tells Mozilla to open the sitemap and then render the site diagram as part of the graphical display of the user agent. While sitemaps themselves may not be the niftiest things in the world, they do occupy a noteworthy position on the web’s timeline as one of the first implementations of RDF.