All posts tagged ‘wiki’

File Under: Glossary

Solaris


A popular and widely-used flavor of Unix, Solaris (formerly named SunOS) is used for large-scale enterprise networks with tens of thousands of active nodes. Solaris is capable of distributed computing (using multiple computers’ processors to complete a single task) and symmetrical multi-processing (running two or more processors in one computer). The OS ships on Sun’s Sparc workstations along with graphical interfaces to increase user-friendliness.

File Under: HTML, Templates

Blank HTML Document

This is a blank HTML document. If you want to make the simplest of web pages, copy and paste this code into a text editor and start typing your awesome content.


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RSS for Beginners

Have you ever noticed those inviting orange buttons on some web pages, or spotted the odd link pitching an “RSS feed”? If you’ve ever clicked one out of curiosity, and then scratched your head at the unformatted gobbledygook in your web browser, you’ve seen an RSS file.

xml.gif

What is it really for, anyway? Two things: RSS (Really Simple Syndication) and Atom are two specialized formats that create what’s commonly called a news feed, or just feed. A feed is an easy way for sites to share headlines and stories so that you can read them without having to visit two dozen different web pages everyday.

In other words, web builders use feeds to dish out fresh news and content from their websites and web surfers can use feed applications to collect custom-tailored selections of their favorite websites to be read at their leisure.


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File Under: Web Services

Get Started With AdWords

With the proliferation of ad-blocking software, and, worse, the widespread anesthesis of the ad neuron in web surfers’ brains, the classic 468×60 banner ad is not the unquestioned moneymaking powerhouse it once was. Advertisers are looking for alternative ways to grab attention.

One inevitably popular approach is to make web ads bigger, flashier, more ubiquitous, and more obtrusive. Flash-based banners, JavaScript popups and popunders, interstitial ad pages, enormous images — these build brand awareness, true, but they are expensive, and risk irritating and possibly alienating potential customers.

There is an alternate approach that’s quickly grown in popularity. Current web darling Google, which is praised for its pin-neat interface (among other things), has long been leading the charge toward small, simple, text-only ads. These ads are set apart in their own table cell off to one side, shaded a different color so they stand out and are easy to notice without being annoying. They are cleanly delineated and out of the way of those who are not interested in them, but easily accessible to those who are. In this way they are presented as a resource, an offer of assistance, rather than a hard, insistent pitch.

Some other sites offering this type of advertising (referred to in some circles as “micro-ads”) simply deal them out from a pool willy-nilly, so that any time a page is viewed it will contain a different ad. Google’s ads, however, are tied into the site’s search engine functionality, synergized or “targeted” if you will, to improve their response rate dramatically.

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File Under: Databases, Programming

Cake and Trax for Beginners

In my last article, Building With Ajax and Rails I made a faintly disparaging joke about some new web frameworks that have been created in fond imitation of Rails. I got a lot of feedback about that joke. I’m not allowed to comment here about the pending lawsuits, but I would ask that the drive-by eggings of my house and threats to my family please cease. (They’ve been relocated to a secret Webmonkey farm anyway.)

Today we’re going to take a look at a couple of those frameworks for PHP:Trax and Cake. Both attempt to bring the quick, easy, helpful tools and easily understood, easily maintained structure of Rails to PHP — a boon to web developers who know PHP and perhaps have some keeper code in that language, but can’t resist the Rails buzz. Both Trax and Cake use the same model-view-controller pattern and Active Record ways of addressing data that Rails does. Makes one curious, no? I don’t have time to get deeply into them today, but both stress “rapid development,” so let’s see if I, your average not-too-bright web developer, can get a little app off the ground before the end of this article.

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